Community Health

An overarching goal for our research is to design and demonstrate sustainable interventions that lead to lasting improvements in population health and health equity.  We work closely with patients, community healthcare providers, members of community organizations, policy decision makers, and other stakeholders to plan, design, execute, and disseminate our research. This approach helps to ensure that our research is practical, sustainable, and addresses priorities that are of greatest importance to communities.  Examples of this work has included helping safety net healthcare providers to improve colorectal cancer screening among hard to reach patients; designing culturally-salient ways of promoting physical activity in south-Asian communities; and working with health payers and YMCA of the USA to adapt the evidence-based diabetes prevention program for sustainable delivery in more than 500 locations throughout the U.S.  For more information about community and stakeholder engaged research at NU, visit our Center for Community Health, which is directed by GIMG faculty member Ronald T. Ackermann , MD, MPH.

 

Resources

Diabetes Link was created by Northwestern University, Northwestern Memorial Hospital and community partners for adult patients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes who need to lose weight. It was a FREE telephone service that helps patients find and use community resources, like exercise classes, gyms and healthy cooking classes.

Authoring Investigator(s): 

Professor of Medicine and Senior Associate Dean for Public Health

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What causes blood sugar to go up and down, how to keep it within the right range, and why it's important. 5 minutes.

Part 2 of a 7-part series discussing how diabetes is caused, how it affects the body, and how to live with it.

Our diabetes modules are designed to teach patients of all levels of literacy and education about the causes of diabetes, its treatment, and its effect on everyday life.  Each module is available as a video or as a printable PDF, in both English and Spanish.

Authoring Investigator(s): 

Adjunct Professor of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine; and Executive Vice President for Healthcare Quality Evaluation at The Joint Commission
Associate Professor

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We created single-page, plain language medication information sheets with content appropriately sequenced from a patient’s perspective (drug name, indication, purpose/benefit, how to take, for how long, when to call your doctor, when to stop taking and call your doctor, important information) and following other health literacy best practices.

Authoring Investigator(s): 

Associate Professor

User Rating: 

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We created single-page, plain language medication information sheets with content appropriately sequenced from a patient’s perspective (drug name, indication, purpose/benefit, how to take, for how long, when to call your doctor, when to stop taking and call your doctor, important information) and following other health literacy best practices. These sheets were generated for approximately 125 different common chronic disease medications.  Lexile analyses on initial information sheets confirmed each to meet a < 8th grade readability standard.

Authoring Investigator(s): 

Associate Professor

User Rating: 

0

We created single-page, plain language medication information sheets with content appropriately sequenced from a patient’s perspective (drug name, indication, purpose/benefit, how to take, for how long, when to call your doctor, when to stop taking and call your doctor, important information) and following other health literacy best practices.

Authoring Investigator(s): 

Associate Professor

User Rating: 

0

We created single-page, plain language medication information sheets with content appropriately sequenced from a patient’s perspective (drug name, indication, purpose/benefit, how to take, for how long, when to call your doctor, when to stop taking and call your doctor, important information) and following other health literacy best practices.

Authoring Investigator(s): 

Associate Professor

User Rating: 

0

We created single-page, plain language medication information sheets with content appropriately sequenced from a patient’s perspective (drug name, indication, purpose/benefit, how to take, for how long, when to call your doctor, when to stop taking and call your doctor, important information) and following other health literacy best practices.

Authoring Investigator(s): 

Associate Professor

User Rating: 

0

We created single-page, plain language medication information sheets with content appropriately sequenced from a patient’s perspective (drug name, indication, purpose/benefit, how to take, for how long, when to call your doctor, when to stop taking and call your doctor, important information) and following other health literacy best practices.

Authoring Investigator(s): 

Associate Professor

User Rating: 

0

We created single-page, plain language medication information sheets with content appropriately sequenced from a patient’s perspective (drug name, indication, purpose/benefit, how to take, for how long, when to call your doctor, when to stop taking and call your doctor, important information) and following other health literacy best practices.

Authoring Investigator(s): 

Associate Professor

User Rating: 

0

We created single-page, plain language medication information sheets with content appropriately sequenced from a patient’s perspective (drug name, indication, purpose/benefit, how to take, for how long, when to call your doctor, when to stop taking and call your doctor, important information) and following other health literacy best practices.

Authoring Investigator(s): 

Associate Professor

User Rating: 

0