Quality Improvement and Safety

Because of the extreme complexity of health problems and medical care, delivering the highest quality, safest care possible is challenging.  To achieve the best quality of care possible, we must improve communication and engagement with patients, improve health care team structure and interactions, and use of electronic health records to alert clinicians to health care needs and give them tools to facilitate delivery of recommended care.   Our research touches all of these areas.  We are nationally recognized for our research in how to use electronic health records for quality measurement and to improve quality and safety.  We are also examining overuse of tests and treatments, including how to use the principles of behavioral economics to discourage antibiotic prescribing.  Successful strategies are then incorporated into our routine care in our Northwestern Medicine® clinic, creating a “learning health system.” 

 

Resources

We created single-page, plain language medication information sheets with content appropriately sequenced from a patient’s perspective (drug name, indication, purpose/benefit, how to take, for how long, when to call your doctor, when to stop taking and call your doctor, important information) and following other health literacy best practices. These sheets were generated for approximately 125 different common chronic disease medications.  Lexile analyses on initial information sheets confirmed each to meet a < 8th grade readability standard.

Authoring Investigator(s): 

Associate Professor

User Rating: 

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We created single-page, plain language medication information sheets with content appropriately sequenced from a patient’s perspective (drug name, indication, purpose/benefit, how to take, for how long, when to call your doctor, when to stop taking and call your doctor, important information) and following other health literacy best practices.

Authoring Investigator(s): 

Associate Professor

User Rating: 

0

We created single-page, plain language medication information sheets with content appropriately sequenced from a patient’s perspective (drug name, indication, purpose/benefit, how to take, for how long, when to call your doctor, when to stop taking and call your doctor, important information) and following other health literacy best practices.

Authoring Investigator(s): 

Associate Professor

User Rating: 

0

We created single-page, plain language medication information sheets with content appropriately sequenced from a patient’s perspective (drug name, indication, purpose/benefit, how to take, for how long, when to call your doctor, when to stop taking and call your doctor, important information) and following other health literacy best practices.

Authoring Investigator(s): 

Associate Professor

User Rating: 

0

We created single-page, plain language medication information sheets with content appropriately sequenced from a patient’s perspective (drug name, indication, purpose/benefit, how to take, for how long, when to call your doctor, when to stop taking and call your doctor, important information) and following other health literacy best practices.

Authoring Investigator(s): 

Associate Professor

User Rating: 

0